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Teletherapy
Teletherapy

Questions about teletherapy? The Triad Teletherapy Guide has answers.

Considering incorporating virtual support for your patients through teletherapy but not sure how each state’s rules and regulations might affect you? Our Teletherapy Guide is ready to answer your questions about state-specific laws with up-to-date information for all 50 of the United States and Washington D.C.

Wondering where to start?

Start by exploring the Teletherapy FAQ that can be found here. This helpful tool answers many common questions about teletherapy such as Do I have to include any special language in my informed consent when providing teletherapy?, Is there any reciprocity between states that would allow me to practice teletherapy with an out-of-state license?, When will the COVID-19 provisions expire? and more.

Get Invaluable State-Specific Information

You can find quick links to each state within the Teletherapy Guide by scrolling through the Highlighted Topics found on the right side of the guide window as shown here:

Every state page within the Teletherapy Guide contains a useful General Guide that applies to all licensures as well as licensure-specific information that will help you quickly and precisely identify any rules or regulations that may apply to your particular licensure.

Stay In the Loop

We’ll regularly review the Teletherapy guide to ensure information in the guide is current and will update the guide as any changes take place to state teletherapy laws or regulations. Keep up to date with those changes by joining the Teletherapy Guide group by clicking the Join Group button:

If you have any questions or comments about the Teletherapy... (More)

Behavioral Telehealth Loses Momentum Without a Regulatory Boost

Pre-pandemic, patients sometimes traveled several hours for addiction care, said Emily Behar, director of clinical operations for Ophelia, a New York startup serving people with opioid addictions. Or patients might be struggling with multiple jobs or a lack of child care. Such obstacles made sustaining care fraught.

“How do you reach those people?” she asked.

It’s a question preoccupying much of the behavioral health sector, complicated by the reality that most patients with opioid use disorder aren’t in treatment, said Dr. Neeraj Gandotra, chief medical officer of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.

Keep reading here

Questions about teletherapy? The Triad Teletherapy Guide has answers.

Considering incorporating virtual support for your patients through teletherapy but not sure how each state’s rules and regulations might affect you? Our Teletherapy Guide is ready to answer your questions about state-specific laws with up-to-date information for all 50 of the United States and Washington D.C.

Wondering where to start?

Start by exploring the Teletherapy FAQ that can be found here. This helpful tool answers many common questions about teletherapy such as Do I have to include any special language in my informed consent when providing teletherapy?, Is there any reciprocity between states that would allow me to practice teletherapy with an out-of-state license?, When will the COVID-19 provisions expire? and more.

Get Invaluable State-Specific Information

You can find quick links to each state within the Teletherapy Guide by scrolling through the Highlighted Topics found on the right side of the guide window as shown here:

Every state page within the Teletherapy Guide contains a useful General Guide that applies to all licensures as well as licensure-specific information that will help you quickly and precisely identify any rules or regulations that may apply to your particular licensure.

Stay In the Loop

We’ll regularly review the Teletherapy guide to ensure information in the guide is current and will update the guide as any changes take place to state teletherapy laws or regulations. Keep up to date with those changes by joining the Teletherapy Guide group by clicking the Join Group button:

If you have any questions or comments about the Teletherapy... (More)

Telehealth is here to stay. Psychologists should equip themselves to offer it

Telehealth continues to play a significant role in the health care industry. However, psychologists who offer both in-person and virtual services are poised to meet increased demand for flexible, accessible mental health care.

In 2020, psychologists responded to the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic by making a nearly universal pivot to telehealth. This rapid and widespread adoption was largely enabled by the federal government’s declaration of a public health emergency (PHE), which prompted several significant policy changes that made telehealth more feasible for both patients and providers.

Keep reading here